Monthly Archives: September 2017

Three Ways the New Gmail Upgrade Will Boost Your Marketing Campaign

Gmail is a free email service operated and owned by search giant Google. They currently boast a subscriber base of over 1 billion users, which translates to one in seven people in the world using Gmail.

Gmail Sponsored Promotions (GSP) offers businesses the opportunity to market their product to a large user base.

GSP is sometimes referred to as an impression-based medium. This means that users are exposed to your ad without asking what your content is. Bear in mind this is not a search, you are requesting the user to make an unconscious action of clicking a link they naturally wouldn’t.

For advertisers pursuing leads with a conversion goal of free models or trails, GSP is effective in driving these ‘free’ conversions without hassle.

What is GSP?

GSP is a google service that was launched without fan fare in 2013 with google soft selling ads rather than a full promotion. GSP are advertisements that appear on Gmail user accounts. It is displayed in the inbox, right above the email. The Ads are cleverly designed to look like an email and it expands to a full Ad once clicked.

How does Gmail Ads Work?

Google moved GSP into a standard AdWords toolbox.  The name changed from GSP to simply ‘Gmail Ads’.  The new Gmail Ad appears in the personal Gmail inboxes under the ‘promotions’ tab.

The Gmail Ad is ‘pushed’ to an inbox even when the user did not search for the advertised content. Google secretly crawls Gmail user accounts and compiles information essential with advertisers. Advertisers can select their audiences based on interests, likes and behaviour. They are charged per click when there is an interaction with the ad. This model for online marketing campaigns benefits leads based ads rather than direct sales. Naturally, online users respond best to the ‘freemium’ model or free trial. Users are more likely to click on Ads offering free membership or content. Google Ads impresses with the capacity to deliver leads from those unwilling users.

Three ways to boost your marketing with Gmail upgrades

  1. Targeting is a fantastic substitute to remarketing. Businesses can target recent interest generated by the user and this will enhance your ability to target users more likely to interact with your ad.
  2. Research conducted by Emery Barnes reveals that 87% of online marketers utilise Gmail Ads, 25% of the emails were opened regularly and 30% more masked with emoji. To engage users, advertisers are encouraged to use emojis as this will lead to more conversion for the ad.
  3. Gmail Ads has a metric function that allows you to analyse and monitor your campaign. This way you can review your AdWords strategy to match current trends popular among users.

Gmail Ads is a desirable method of advertising that has earned the admiration of consumers and marketers globally.  Forever changing how advertising and digital marketing will be conducted.

How to Prove Your Facebook Ads Are Working

Wouldn’t it be grand to have a way to defend Facebook Ads using the numbers most people are interested in, rather than mere qualitative analysis? This method is a straight forward one, but requires that you have your Google Analytics and Facebook accounts linked. It helps to have an organised GA account too. Ensure you have Excel and enough Google Analytics and Facebook data to work with.

Step one

Head to Google Analytics, go to “Conversions”, “Top Conversion Paths”, and then “Source/Medium Path”. Select “advanced” and adjust your filter so it includes Source/Medium Path with Facebook. What this does is to leave you only with conversion paths that include “facebook” or whatever it’s named. Once you’re certain you have all the conversion paths needed set to download, select “Export”, for conversions, use “All”, one or more path links, “All” for Type, and 30 days (or whatever you wish) for your Lookback Window before you export in csv format.

Step two

Open the file in Excel, copy the single-path data and paste it somewhere else, before you remove it from the raw data. Have a column inserted between “Conversions” and “Source/Medium Path”, naming it “Facebook Path Detail.” Have columns A to D filtered such that Source/Medium Path is filtered with “Begins with: “facebook” and use the same title for column B’s displayed empty rows.

Next, adjust the Source/Medium Path’s filter to “Begins with: facebook” AND “Ends with: facebook”. Name all of column B’s displayed empty rows with “Begins/Ends with Facebook.” There should be an overwrite in some rows. Then, set the Source/Medium Path filer to “Ends with: facebook / cpc” and name the empty column B cells “Ends with Facebook.” Make sure there are no overwrites.

Finally, clear the last two filters and selecting only the blanks let the Source/Medium Path have another filter. Let all empty cells left be named “Contains Facebook” before you clear the filters and check to make sure column B has no empty cells.

Step three

Select everything in columns D to B, select Insert and then Pivot Table. Hit “Ok”, put the table in a new sheet, set your pivot fields such that your data will appear in a compressed view, and head back to your sheet.

Step four

Copy the table and have the values pasted in a different sheet, with the name “Paid Facebook – Attribution (Multi-Path)” added. Next to the attribution data, paste the single-path data you cut out earlier and name it “Paid Facebook – Single Path Conversions.” Once you’re sure the date ranges have been added, have the rest formatted however you like. This will give you a qualitative understanding of your paid Facebook efforts which anyone can understand.

Google Announces Major Changes to Ad Rotation Settings

Google recently announced some major changes to ad rotation settings in AdWords that will take place starting from the 15th of September. These changes will bring an end to the long-standing debate among advertisers about the best way to test different ads in each ad group. While all paid search advertisers can certainly agree that ad testing is important, should they let them rotate blindly, make changes after a 90-day period, or optimise them to increase clicks and enjoy more conversions? It seems the answer doesn’t matter anymore because now, the changes simplify the matter by trimming the AdWords ad rotations settings for a simpler solution.

The Major Changes to Ad Rotation Settings

Google AdWords will support only two rotation settings where you can either choose to optimise or rotate indefinitely. The first option to optimise (prefer best performing ads), will employ Google’s machine learning technology to deliver ads with the potential to do better than the other ads in the ad group. Choosing ‘do not optimise (rotate ads indefinitely) allows your ads to rotate continuously without putting priority on better performing ads to a user’s search.

The existing settings ‘optimise for conversions’ and ‘rotate evenly’ will be abandoned and where the options to ‘Optimise for clicks’, ‘Optimise for conversions’ and ‘Rotate evenly are being used by campaigns, there will be automatic change to the new ‘Optimise’ setting.

Regardless of how campaigns set their ad rotation settings for their smart bidding strategies like Enhanced CPC, target CPA or target ROAS, their ad rotation will automatically be set to ‘Optimise’ as a result of Google’s new decision. In addition, advertisers can easily control their new ad rotation settings at the campaign level and at the ad group level as well.

The Impact of the Changes on Advertisers

Besides the major effect being forcing search marketers to stay on top of their testing schedules if they aren’t already, the announced changes to AdWords rotation will affect many advertisers using the usual ad rotation and bidding strategies.

This means if your campaigns currently make use of either the ‘Rotate evenly’ or ‘Optimise for conversions ad rotation setting’ you will notice the new changes in your account sometime in late September. Campaigns employing smart bidding strategies such as target CPA, enhanced CPC or target ROAS bidding strategies are not left out either.

Although some advertisers would naturally not be inclined to trust Google to optimise their ad rotation, you can reasonably expect to see positive performance n CTR and CPA from making the change.

Preparing for Changes in Ad Rotation Settings

There’s nothing to be done in advance since the transition will automatically occur in late September. Still, it is advisable to pay close attention to your accounts in order to see how they respond to said changes.

Advertisers presently making use of the ‘Rotate evenly’ option should work to finish up current ad tests and possibly migrate to an optimise setting before the ad rotation change takes place to get the most out of ad tests in the future. A smart bidding strategy is a better option for advertisers currently using the ‘Optimise for conversions’ setting in order to optimise their bids in real time auctions.

On a final note, if you are dissatisfied with the proposed changes to be made to your account, you can always choose the ‘Do Not Optimise’ ad rotation so that your ads are rotated evenly into each search auction.